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Amberpolish

Polished bead of an amber.

Amber (or, technically, resinite) is fossilized tree resin (not sap), which has been appreciated for its color and natural beauty since Neolithic times. Good quality amber is used for the manufacture of ornamental objects and jewelry. There are five classes of amber, defined on the basis of their chemical constituents.

Because it originates as a soft, sticky tree resin, amber sometimes includes animal and plant material as inclusions.

FormationEdit

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Spider trapped inside an amber.

ResinInsect

Prehistoric Insects being trapped in resin from Tree to produce Amber millions of years later on.

Molecular polymerization, resulting from high pressures and temperatures produced by overlying sediment, transforms the resin first into copal. Sustained heat and pressure drives off terpenes and results in the formation of amber.


AppearanceEdit

Flyamber

Fly in amber.

Orangeber

Orange piece of amber.

Amber occurs in a range of different colors. As well as the usual yellow-orange-brown that is associated with the color "amber", amber itself can range from a whitish color through a pale lemon yellow, to brown and almost black. Other more uncommon colors include red amber (sometimes known as "cherry amber"), green amber, and even blue amber, which is rare and highly sought after.

Much of the most highly-prized amber is transparent, in contrast to the very common cloudy amber and opaque amber. Opaque amber contains numerous minute bubbles. This kind of amber is known as "bony amber".

Although all Dominican amber is fluorescent, the rarest Dominican amber is blue amber. It turns blue in natural sunlight and any other partially or wholly ultraviolet light source. In long-wave UV light it has a very strong reflection, almost white. Only about 100 kg is found per year, which makes it valuable and expensive.

Sometimes amber retains the form of drops and stalactites, just as it exuded from the ducts and receptacles of the injured trees. It is thought that, in addition to exuding onto the surface of the tree, amber resin also originally flowed into hollow cavities or cracks within trees, thereby leading to the development of large lumps of amber of irregular form.

See alsoEdit

Organic gemstones
Fossilized Amber · Ammolite · Copal · Jet
Contemporary Coral · Pearl · Mother-of-pearl · Ivory
Related articles Gemstone · Semi-Precious gemstone · Precious gemstone · Stub · Mineraloids

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